Is this due to the torsion bars on my RA Rodeo?

Springs, shocks and all things between your chassis and diffs
jscottnjs
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Is this due to the torsion bars on my RA Rodeo?

Unread post by jscottnjs » April 5th, 2019, 11:58 am

Hi all, I need some advice from the brains trust....AGAIN

The vehicle in question is a 2004 Holden RA Rodeo
I am thinking that my torsion bar could be an issue. I have new front shocks & everything is tight, nothing loose, but when I measure the distance from the ground to the guard the difference between front left and right is 40mm. Also I find I am hitting my bump stops very often, and not on hard ground or large bumps?!

Peter Aawen
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Re: Is this due to the torsion bars on my RA Rodeo?

Unread post by Peter Aawen » April 5th, 2019, 3:01 pm

Is it the Right side that is lower? Or the left?

Many vehicles leave the Dealers in Aust set up with the Right side slightly lower than the left (often around 40mm or so) simply to cater for the tendency in Aussie roads to have a camber that sees the centre of the road being made higher so the Right side of cars are driving higher up the slope - so by lowering that front side of the suspension, it removes the tendency of the vehicle to 'crab' along the slight slope of the road surface, and it frees the driver from the need to always steer a little right to avoid drifting off the road to the left.

Get your wheel alignment checked, & if it is aimed straight ahead & within spec, leave it & your suspension alone, they are set & working as they were intended to be! But if the right side suspension is sitting on the bump stops, or even only very nearly so, there's a good chance that the right side has sagged due to it always carrying the load of the driver & possibly even the fuel tank too - what side is the larger portion of the tank on?

Another thing that upsets some but shouldn't, is for the rear of their ute or wagon to sit up higher than the front when the back is effectively empty. That's so the car doesn't drag its bum along the road whenever there is any sort of load carried - the vehicle was designed to sit that way when empty, don't mess with it or you'll risk wearing things out quickly & very likely in a way they shouldn't wear too!
An Ex-Service person is someone who thought enough about their country & how great it is, how lucky we are to live here, to write a blank cheque made out to 'The People and Commonwealth of Australia' for the value of 'Up to & including my Life!'

jscottnjs
I'm new, be nice!
Posts: 9
Joined: January 26th, 2018, 11:01 am

Re: Is this due to the torsion bars on my RA Rodeo?

Unread post by jscottnjs » April 5th, 2019, 5:05 pm

Hi Peter, Thank you for your reply, the drivers side is higher and i also have a long range tank which is on the left (pax side), It also hits the bump stops whether full or empty. Like i said i have brand new shocks in the front as i thought that was the issue but the problem stayed the same. Heaven forbid when i drive on the beach and go over some whoops, both sides of the car smash the bump stops.

Peter Aawen
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Re: Is this due to the torsion bars on my RA Rodeo?

Unread post by Peter Aawen » April 5th, 2019, 5:31 pm

Depending on which type of bump stops, which arm they are mounted on, & where on the arm they are, raising the ride height too much by winding up the torsion bars can do pretty much exactly what you describe! :purplex:

When the fuelled vehicle sits on level ground with the driver inside, at the static ride height the applicable arm/bump stop should be somewhere in the middle one third of the total range of travel as governed by the upper & lower stock bump extremities - so it should have at least 1/3rd of its total travel available in the UP direction, and at least 1/3rd in the DOWN direction. So those driving on sagged IFS or the people who wind their IFsuspension up can often exceed that 1/3rd restriction & as a result, the vehicle either has no down-travel at all, or if it's sagged badly enough, it'll smash into the bump stops on every little bump!! Oh, and in either case the vehicle technically won't be roadworthy/legal either, so having a prang that damages another vehicle or property, or worse, a prang that injures anyone else, could well be very expensive.... insurance policies can be declared void if the vehicle owner has knowingly driven an unroadworthy vehicle! :petrified:

Has your vehicle had its suspension wound up at all?? Or has it sagged a lot?

Just as an aside, even new shocks SHOULD NOT control the ride height of the vehicle, nor should they really do anything more than control the rebound & compression of the suspension. The springs, in this case your torsion bars, should do all the height setting, SUSPENSION & the LOAD CARRYING; while the shocks control any sudden movements & suspress any continued oscillation in those springs once they are called into play in compression or rebound. So if you are using shocks to establish ride height, you are expecting too much of them and of their mounts! :rolleyes:
An Ex-Service person is someone who thought enough about their country & how great it is, how lucky we are to live here, to write a blank cheque made out to 'The People and Commonwealth of Australia' for the value of 'Up to & including my Life!'

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