105 series 1999 aftermarket turbo gets hot on idle

Giarc
I'm new, be nice!
Posts: 3
Joined: December 12th, 2017, 9:23 pm

105 series 1999 aftermarket turbo gets hot on idle

Unread post by Giarc » December 12th, 2017, 10:14 pm

Hi, I have a 1999 hzj105r with an aftermarket turbo. I bought this vehicle with 210,00 kms on the clock. It now has 226000 kms on the clock and the turbo was fitted locally at 40,000 kms buy a reputable turbo bloke. I am the 3rd owner and it seemed to have a good service history in the log book oil changed at 5000kms. My issue is it gets to 100 degrees block temperature if we sit on idle after a good drive. This may take a while but it does get there unless I watch the engine watchdog and Keeps the revs up. It’s had a new head and valves done 5000kms ago , reconditioned injectors. New Ali radiator, viscous fan hub, hoses, thermostat, water pump, timing belt , radiator cap, the works. Before we did the head it did not get hot?? Until my mechanic left the heater hose off after my service for the timing belt and water pump to be done.It has not been tuned after the work was done On the head and injectors could this be the problem or is the aftermarket viscous fan hub faulty? It dosnt free spool but I am noticing some built up of oil or something on the fan itself. Cheers Craig

Peter Aawen
Admin
Posts: 20807
Joined: June 17th, 2005, 8:01 pm

Re: 105 series 1999 aftermarket turbo gets hot on idle

Unread post by Peter Aawen » December 12th, 2017, 10:35 pm

Aftermarket viscous fan hubs are renowned for not being as good as the OE units, and if you also have suspicious looking 'fluid' that could be oil or maybe even silicone around the fan hub already, then I'd be very carefully checking that out - or maybe even trying a 'known good' OE hub....

Does the fan hub cut the fan in when things get hot at idle? If it doesn't, it should... so that would pretty much put the seal on your a/mkt hub being at least part of the issue! If the hub is locked up even when things are cold, it shouldn't be, it should spin freely then & only start to lock in once things start getting warm.... so the extra load of driving that at idle could be what is putting the 'extra thermal load' on the cooling system at idle & causing the overheating in the first place!! :eek:

Sort the fan hub first, & see what happens then. ;)

Oh, & welcome to the Forum too! :thumb:
An Ex-Service person is someone who thought enough about their country & how great it is, how lucky we are to live here, to write a blank cheque made out to 'The People and Commonwealth of Australia' for the value of 'Up to & including my Life!'

Giarc
I'm new, be nice!
Posts: 3
Joined: December 12th, 2017, 9:23 pm

Re: 105 series 1999 aftermarket turbo gets hot on idle

Unread post by Giarc » December 12th, 2017, 10:59 pm

Thanks peter will throw in a different hub off a wreck in the morning and see how she goes. The aftermarket one that’s in there now just has NPW japan written on it cost $185 by memory.

Peter Aawen
Admin
Posts: 20807
Joined: June 17th, 2005, 8:01 pm

Re: 105 series 1999 aftermarket turbo gets hot on idle

Unread post by Peter Aawen » December 13th, 2017, 6:37 am

There are some 'otherwise good quality' a/mkt hubs out there that just don't seem to have the temperature settings quite right, & they either lock up too late, so the cooling system gets too hot too soon & then the fan can't drag enough air thru the radiator to get the temp back down to an acceptable level; or they lock up too early & the extra load of dragging the fan around at idle pushes the cooling system over its threshold limit, even tho they might work OK whenever you are moving.... I suspect you've got one of the latter. There again, the oil or fluid around the hub area could mean it's leaking or dumped its load of silicone & so is now just not up to its air pulling task at idle but your system manages anyway once it's got air flow from movement.... Dunno for sure, so try an OE hub you know should work to remove the hub from the suspect cause list.... or not! :rolleyes:

These things can be fun trying to diagnose, they are waaayyyy more complex than most people realise, and as you sorta guessed in your first post, yes, the pump/injector timing or over-fuelling can cause overheating, altho not normally at idle.... but if it was over-fuelling at idle, you should be seeing a lot of black smoke! ;)
An Ex-Service person is someone who thought enough about their country & how great it is, how lucky we are to live here, to write a blank cheque made out to 'The People and Commonwealth of Australia' for the value of 'Up to & including my Life!'

Giarc
I'm new, be nice!
Posts: 3
Joined: December 12th, 2017, 9:23 pm

Re: 105 series 1999 aftermarket turbo gets hot on idle

Unread post by Giarc » December 13th, 2017, 11:46 am

Thanks for response peter, ok the replacement hub is in I got from a wrecker. I pulled the new aftermarket hub apart that was in and it was full of fluid. I have had it on idle for about 40mins ( no revs or driving and the block temp still got upto 98 degrees on the watchdog and to about 3 quarters on the factory gauge. So I up the revs and took it down to 90 dec and shut it down. Spoke to my radiator guy and he reckons it’s the biggest that can go in off the shelf without going to a full custom alloy??

Peter Aawen
Admin
Posts: 20807
Joined: June 17th, 2005, 8:01 pm

Re: 105 series 1999 aftermarket turbo gets hot on idle

Unread post by Peter Aawen » December 13th, 2017, 1:43 pm

So given that the viscous hub is working and the temp you are reporting is below boiling point, and even more below the boiling temp of your pressurised cooling system at idle, what does the temp do while you are driving? When you increased engine revs & the temp came down, was that because the fan cut in or just due to increased coolant circulation? You should be able to hear & feel the fan do its thing for a moment after a cold start, then it should cut out & let the fan just free spool until the temps increase to around thermostat opening temp, when the fan should audibly cut in again, hard enough that you feel the extra air flow that causes the temp to drop.... is it doing that?

Moving on a tad, & not trying to teach anyone to suck eggs, but rather just thinking out loud so those who may not know can follow the process.... since you believe everything else in the cooling system 'should' be in good working nick, the next question should probably be how sure are you that your temperature readings are correct?? Toyota's have been known to 'damp' the reaction of their stock temp gauges, so the gauge doesn't respond to the temp changes that DO happen as the engine load varies, which means the temp gauge stays rock steady while the cooling system temps go up & down within the perfectly acceptable range that is below boiling.... some people get worried if the gauge leaves mid point ever, while actually that's what they SHOULD do & anything that's not in the red is fine... gauges that never move from mid point shouldn't make you comfortable that everything is OK, they should alert you to the gauge being unlikely to tell you if anything is wrong until it's waaay too late. Altho you'd hafta hope the scan gauge was giving a good reading... still, has the temp sender been checked??

Next up, do you know what temp the thermostat starts opening at?? Even if the thermstat is new & working fine, if it doesn't start opening until 90 degrees or so then idling for any length of time is quite likely to see the temps get up into the high 90's - but in a properly working system in good nick the coolant still shouldn't boil or be an issue until it reaches about 115-120 degrees C. Buuut, you can get thermostats that start opening at about 75 degrees & are fully open by 80 degrees; and even with those, on 4WD's with bull bars & lights fitted in front of the radiator it often helps to drill an extra 1/8 or 3/16" dia hole in the thermostat flange so that the closed thermostat will allow a little more coolant flow to compensate for the slight reduction in free air flow thru the radiator....

That leads us to consider everything else in front of the radiator - if you have air con, did the a/c heat exchanger get checked for free air flow while the radiator was out?? Cleaning that to ensure it's free of bug bodies & mud from that last mud puddle you played in can make a significant difference to cooling, especially at low speed. So can making sure that all the little rubber skirts & seals etc that are around the engine bay when its new are there - having them all fitted & sealing properly so that all the air flow actually DOES go thru the radiator, back past the engine, then down & out under the car body can make a massive difference to keeping things cool!! And you might be surprised at how much longer the things underneath the car can last if they get proper air flow too!! Things like seals & uni joints, shockers, etc AND trans case, diffs, & axle seals etc benefit too!! So it can pay massive dividends in the long term to keep the OE engine bay skirts & seals etc in good nick, as well as making sure the bonnet seals properly at the top/back of the engine bay, forcing anhh aiur flow thru the front to exit via going down at the back of the engine bay & out underneath the car, passing & cooling everything under there as it goes by....

And when it comes to a/mkt turbos, any restriction in the air intake or the exhaust dump pipe or turbo outlet flange can cause overheating via raised exhaust gas temps they can cause, as can over-fueling, or a restrictive muffler/end pipe on the exhaust... does it get hot if you hold in a high gear (5th/over-drive) & push it to maintain hwy speeds up a looong steep climb?? That's usually a give-away for over-fueling. Or, does your injector pump have an aneroid altitude compensator on it?? Have you had that checked to ensure it's working properly?? Cos they work by effectively over-fuelling the engine just a touch at idle/sea level, then restricting the fuel delivery back from that so that it ffoesn't over-fuel as altitude increases &/or barometric pressure decreases - so it might be worth while getting a good diesel tune done now that you've got all the other stuff done, just to make sure that's not contributing.....

Orright, that lot's gotta give you a good start on tracking down any issues that may be left.... hang on, have you made sure that the coolant is the correct concentration?? Andd have you checked & cleaned all the I/P 'fuel filters of last resort' in/under the banjo bolts etc? Any one of that lot being blocked or just a little choked could be contributing.... :crazy: :p
An Ex-Service person is someone who thought enough about their country & how great it is, how lucky we are to live here, to write a blank cheque made out to 'The People and Commonwealth of Australia' for the value of 'Up to & including my Life!'

Return to “100 Series”