Isuzu MUX - D-Max rear axle assy issues - anyone had a weld fracture?

Thommo5458
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Isuzu MUX - D-Max rear axle assy issues - anyone had a weld fracture?

Unread post by Thommo5458 » May 27th, 2019, 4:18 pm

Has anyone experienced a fracture in the welding on the rear axle assembly of an MUX or D-Max - permitting the diff oil to escape... ?

Peter Aawen
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Re: Isuzu MUX - D-Max rear axle assy issues - anyone had a weld fracture?

Unread post by Peter Aawen » May 29th, 2019, 2:15 am

That's probably not something that's all that common Thommo, but if you are driving roughly enough (terrain or driving style!) or if you hit something hard enough with the diff/axle tube, the metal right alongside the welded areas of the diff housing/axle tubes can become a little brittle due to the heating/cooling cycle that welding them up creates, and therefore it's a good place to crack or give way under the stresses of Off Roading! However, unless you've bent the diff/axle housing when you cracked/damaged it, the leak caused by such a crack isn't usually all that hard for a competent welder to repair!

The best way of avoiding that sort of crack or damage is to drive to keep all 4 wheels on the ground all the time! No matter what you see on TV, in the movies or on youtube vids, but stock vehicles, including 4WD's, just aren't up to getting a single wheel airborne too often, let alone getting all 4 wheels in the air at the same time!! You might get away with doing that once or twice in a stock 4By, but do it just once too often & it generally ends with a cracked or bent diff &/or chassis, and probably busted or bent wheel rims &/or blown tyres at the least! The potential damage received 8 thru jumping your
stock 4WD vehicle is usually far more expensive than the cost of beefing things up & strengthening the underpinnings enough to withstand the occasional little bit of getting slightly airborne, but most of those fantastic vids you see around might show the speccy looking jump, but they rarely show the expensive & often terminal for the vehicle aftermath; while the TV shows & movies that show phenomenal jumps usually take (& destroy!) 5 or 6 'throw-away' vehicles just to make the 'hero car' look good in just ONE jump!! Which is why the original 'Dukes of Hazard' TV series was single handedly responsible for the destruction of very nearly all the available vehicles that could be made to look like the 'General Lee' throughout the world! The few that survived are now REALLY collectors items, cos they trashed most of the rest they could find!!! :eek:
An Ex-Service person is someone who thought enough about their country & how great it is, how lucky we are to live here, to write a blank cheque made out to 'The People and Commonwealth of Australia' for the value of 'Up to & including my Life!'

Thommo5458
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Re: Isuzu MUX - D-Max rear axle assy issues - anyone had a weld fracture?

Unread post by Thommo5458 » June 7th, 2019, 1:57 pm

Peter,

I appreciate your comments and observations - however I can assure you that the 10cm fracture in a weld on the rear axle of my Isuzu MU-X was NOT caused through any impact to the axle assembly, reckless or negligent driving.
The vehicle has not been driven on anything other than gazetted roads - admittedly some unsealed and some corrugations - but at no point have any of the the rear wheels been airborne through rough terrain or hoon type driving.

My local Isuzu dealer has completed a comprehensive inspection of the vehicle and axle assembly and did not find any evidence of abuse, damage or driver irresponsibility. They have reported this to Isuzu Australia and I'm waiting for advice back on whether the repairs/ replacement of the axle will e covered by the warranty provisions.

I have attached a photograph showing the damage for your interest.

Thommo
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Peter Aawen
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Re: Isuzu MUX - D-Max rear axle assy issues - anyone had a weld fracture?

Unread post by Peter Aawen » June 7th, 2019, 4:27 pm

I'm sorry Thommo, I didn't mean to imply that YOU had been driving recklessly or negligently: in my first para I was trying to point out that it can be the driving OR the terrain that does the damage (even if you do only drive on gazetted roads!) My second para was more a tirade against the adverts & movies etc that show 4WD's doing things that make people who aren't necessarily aware of what their vehicles can't do think that they can do things in their vehicles that their vehicles really can't handle!! And in doing so, those adverts & movies etc give rise to comments like "But the TV advert shows this model car doing just that!! Whadda ya mean they can't take it?" Or "We saw a car just like mine do exactly that in the movie, and it was fairly easy to do; so how come the movie car survived without any real damage & kept on driving, but mine's wrecked & now it's being written off?!?" While it might seem obvious to many that there's a biiig difference between adverts, TV, the movies etc & real life, I'm pretty sure you'd be absobloodylutely gob-smacked at how many times I've heard variations on those comments above! And you really don't want to get me started on those big speccy plumes of water spray from the wheels as people drive thru or into water that you see pretty much everywhere! :eek:

The pic you've added really does look like it's the weld (or the 'now brittle' metal right alongside the weld!) that's given up the ghost!! And there's no doubt that the 'giving up' will almost certainly have happened during your driving, no matter how gentle that may have been, but that doesn't mean the driving was the cause of the damage!! I've seen that sort of crack happen on strictly bitumen only cars, even some driven by little old ladies only on every second Sunday (& not Bathurst weekend, either!) All that it takes to stuff a weld is to not quite properly match up the edges to be joined; blasting the weld on too hot/too quick; getting some odd gas or other contaminant in it; or even welding at the appropriate temp but just applying the heat for too long so that the parts get too hot, followed by a quick cool down & there it is, that metal is now brittle & not as strong as it needs to be... Once metal in components like that becomes brittle & weakened, then all it takes is a good knock - anything like hitting a 'cat's eye' reflector on the road, a pot hole, bouncing over a kerb, or even just driving over the drop off from the edge of the bitumen onto a slightly eroded verge or as the bitumen changes into a dirt road.... In fact, anything that you can feel & recognise inside the car as a knock or bump in the road can be hard enough to open up a crack like that if the metal around/alongside any weld is brittle! And if it is the weld itself or the metal alongside the weld, then THAT is DEFINITELY a Production issue!! :o
An Ex-Service person is someone who thought enough about their country & how great it is, how lucky we are to live here, to write a blank cheque made out to 'The People and Commonwealth of Australia' for the value of 'Up to & including my Life!'

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