nets on utes

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jfoldbar
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nets on utes

Unread post by jfoldbar » March 9th, 2016, 3:46 pm

lately ive been noticing a lot of utes have a cargo type net on them.
yesterday a plumber told me that last year it became law in nsw to put a net over your ute.
i wonder if anyone knows the details of this and where the line is drawn? meaning, if you have firewood, or bags of cement or something. what stuff needs a net and what doesnt.
btw, i dont own a ute so it doesnt concern me. i have sometimes considered bying a truck for my business. are they under the same laws as utes cause i dont see small trucks with nets, only utes.

stockhorse
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by stockhorse » March 9th, 2016, 3:55 pm

In Qld ,any load must be covered,utes used to get away with it but are now a main target for police. Even a pair of gumboots must be covered,net,tarp shadecloth etc.

jfoldbar
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by jfoldbar » March 9th, 2016, 4:30 pm

but is the purpose of the 'covering' to stop things flying out? what about stuff that can fit through the net? or something that can not possibly fly out like a roll of lead?

stockhorse
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by stockhorse » March 9th, 2016, 5:10 pm

To stop things flying out. The net should be small enough to stop things. Even a roll of lead can fly out in an accident.

Peter Aawen
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by Peter Aawen » March 9th, 2016, 5:43 pm

The publicity push behind it all was labelled 'Secure your Load' & basically calls for ANYTHING that you are carrying in or on your vehicle to be secured from flying or falling off.... & it doesn't just apply to utes or tray tops either, it also applies to any vehicle that is carrying gear on the vehicle, its' roof racks, &/or outside the cabin; so even the coffee cup you left on the bull bar this morning & forgot can cost you!! ;)
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nilla60
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by nilla60 » March 9th, 2016, 10:18 pm

Guy I know got fined for having his kid's school bag loose in the back.

The mechanics are that in theory you can be fined for *each* unsecured item.

Throwing a net over means you don't need to secure each item individually. Stupid thing in the mesh size can be large enough to let them through anyway.

Ditto with boats. I made a canvas cover so I don't need to remove a (literal) boat load of gear at the ramp.

Unfortunate that it's a one size fits all prescriptive answer, but even I have had enough with clowns with random junk flying out the back of their utes and trailers. Would be positively terrifying if you were on a motorbike.

Shann Low
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by Shann Low » March 9th, 2016, 10:34 pm

Secure your load!

Take a look at how quick, the roadside gets covered in trash from vehicles - even after the service clubs etc clean the roadside verge to raise funds... a week later & it's trashed again!.

I know I have lost stuff out the back of the ute before today - picked up a box of that foam anti-con corrugated foam strip stuff that you seal the ridge line of a corrugated tin roof for a mate from a neighboring town as a favor!

Put in the back of the ute tray behind the cab, and half an hour later when we got home it wasn't there!

It was expensive stuff and I drove up and down that road looking for the cardboard box about 3 or 4 more times.... to no avail... so i guess someone snaffled it!.

But if you multiply that times 10,000 every day, its no wonder our roads side verges area mess all round this country.

As stated stuff can fly out in an accident and kill someone else.

It makes sense when you think about it.

Cover your load - the trucks are all coming with roll tarps etc nowadays.

Roadwarrior
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by Roadwarrior » March 10th, 2016, 1:40 am

Interesting subject. A tradie mate of ours said ages ago when this first came up that a net had to go on to a ute, but the RACQ Road Ahead magazine said that there was no such law in Qld. Somebody got it wrong.

Rogers Cruiser
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by Rogers Cruiser » March 10th, 2016, 2:16 am

Its not a law that says you need a net, but rather you have to have your load secured. there is no law saying that you need a net to contain things on the back of the ute.

Its a systematic change in policing policies, loose items are now not considered restrained if they are unlikely to leave the ute back, now they are restrained if they CANNOT leave the ute.

if you have a fridge on the back of your ute, you dont need a net, but you do need a strap to hold it.

HOWEVER,
Due to the nature of the way this policy was enforced in QLD the effective law is that a net/tarp/cloath is the only way to carry unsecured items on the back of a ute/trailer.
Last edited by Rogers Cruiser on March 10th, 2016, 12:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
'98-'06 - FJ-45 Ute fell over one day and didnt survive
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now - Off Road Box/Camper Trailer. viewtopic.php?f=134&t=153968&p=1792444#p1792444

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jfoldbar
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by jfoldbar » March 10th, 2016, 4:02 am

peter.
what youre suggesting is i can be fined for putting the grocery shopping behind the back seat without securing it.

nilla.
youre right in that most of the time, the stuff that the net is holding down will fit through the net anyway.
so what is actually achieved other than the mental perception that it is secured?

rodger,
if its not law, then why do people get fined for it?

the concept that the 'load must be covered' and the 'load must be secured' are 2 different things.
if i have a ute with some bricks with a cheap bunnings tarp tied over it, it is a covered load but it is not secure.
if a b-double has 3 ton boulders and his truck tarp covering, if he flips over, as if his tarp is gunna stop the boulder from squashing me. yet in the eyes of the law, im guessing his load is secure? why? because it has sides and a tarp?

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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by Peter Aawen » March 10th, 2016, 8:23 am

Well it is actually a law, just not a law that says you need to use a net, but the basic 'your load must be secured' law has been around for ages.... and now (as mentioned by more'n just me) there's been a National push to police it a lot more stringently than in the past, & there's been a push to cover EVERY LOAD that can have ANY degree of debris blown off it as you drive along as well!! So things that weren't seen as an issue once are now being picked up - the gym boots or school bag on the back of the ute, the coffee cup on the bull bar, the leaves in your trailer, even covering the load of dusty bricks or sand in a high sided tray; and yes jfoldbar, if putting a bag of groceries behind the back seat leaves it in a position where the cop following thinks it might be at risk of flying or falling OFF the vehicle then it could also include that!! But if your groceries are inside the cabin, they are sorta unlikely to fly or fall off your vehicle & it ain't so obvious to external viewers, & besides, in-cab loads generally fall under different constraints (but they are still meant to be positioned or secured in such a way that they cannot move or fall into a position that can impede the driver from safely operating the vehicle or disrupt the driver's vision out of the vehicle!!) However, if you put some light stuff in a bag on the floor behind the seat or anywhere in the cab near or under an open window & it flies outta the car as you drive along, then you should expect to cop a fine for 'failing to secure your load' if it's seen by the local police or worse, if it causes or contributes to an accident!! :eek:

Regardless, the legislation that requires you to adequately restrain & secure your load has been around for ages (I think the first mention of this anywhere in Aust was passed in the early 1930's & I believe the latest changes were agreed upon & then enacted by all Aust States & Territories in March/April 2015!) & generally applies to the load on or in your ute tub, trailer, or truck tray, on your roof rack, or effectively covers anything that can come OFF your vehicle/tray/trailer as you drive normally down the road - & then there are other sections of legislation that apply to HOW 'secure' your load is (inside the cab &/or outside the cab are both covered) or how it is to be 'restrained' covering both 'normal driving' &/or if you have a prang.... you name it, we've got legislation in Aust to cover pretty much every permutation of anything & everything you can think of happening on the road!! :rolleyes:

The current push in enforcing these laws is pretty much due to the growing number of accidents & injuries caused to 'other' vehicles & people by gear coming off the vehicle that was carrying it; & it really doesn't call for 'covering your load' as such, but it does call for any load to be 'secured' in such a way that it or any part of it can not be blown off or fall off your vehicle. People have been fined for carrying a load of leaves with just a net 'securing' it - of course if the leaves fit thru the net then it won't stop them blowing off, so in that instance the net is NOT SECURING THE LOAD, but a tarp might have been sufficient to ensure that the load of leaves or any part of it could not blow, fly, or fall off the carrying vehicle. People have even been fined for having a coffee cup sliding around on the bull bar; for taking a load of dry leaves covered by nothing but a net in their trailer on the way to the tip; & others for having a 20 kilo roll of plumbers flashing lead sitting in the middle of their tray hard up against the headboard but otherwise un-restrained by anything but its own weight.... Stuff that would've been let by in the past is now being clamped down on, but the legislation behind it has been around for decades in one form or another.

I really dunno what the issue is here, it's pretty much common sense - if you are carrying something in your tub/tray or elsewhere on your vehicle, you hafta make sure it's secure & that it isn't likely to end up coming off your vehicle.... :rolleyes:
An Ex-Service person is someone who thought enough about their country & how great it is, how lucky we are to live here, to write a blank cheque made out to 'The People and Commonwealth of Australia' for the value of 'Up to & including my Life!'

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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by hoyks » March 10th, 2016, 12:10 pm

Lots of Chinese whispers, a bit like the one that was started saying you need 'rated shackles' for you box trailer. It just so happens that the bloke that started that one had a shipping container of suitably 'rated shackles' that he could do you a deal on.

The law says your load must be suitable restrained.
Load restraint system basic requirements

Loads must be restrained to prevent unsafe movement during all conditions of operation. The load restraint system must, therefore, satisfy the following requirements:

the load should not become dislodged from the vehicle
any load movement should be limited, such that in all cases where movement occurs, the vehicle’s stability and weight distribution cannot be adversely affected and the load cannot become dislodged from the vehicle.

Loads that are permitted to move relative to the vehicle include loads that are effectively contained within the sides or enclosure of the vehicle body such as:

loads which are restrained from moving horizontally (limited vertical movement is permissible)
very lightweight objects or loose bulk loads (limited horizontal and vertical movement is permissible)
bulk liquids (limited liquid movement is permissible).
http://www.ntc.gov.au/heavy-vehicles/sa ... int-guide/
So, old mate with his kids school bag should have appealed on this clause: very lightweight objects or loose bulk loads (limited horizontal and vertical movement is permissible), provided he had sides on the ute.

And the Queensland guidelines, they are based on the above, but they have gone a bit further in the interpretation. http://www.tmr.qld.gov.au/Safety/Vehicl ... raint.aspx

stockhorse
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by stockhorse » March 10th, 2016, 2:34 pm

"So, old mate with his kids school bag should have appealed on this clause: very lightweight objects or loose bulk loads (limited horizontal and vertical movement is permissible), provided he had sides on the ute."
He did not have limited vertical movement

GBC
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by GBC » March 16th, 2016, 4:42 pm

As explained by the nice officer who fined my mate for a carton of beer in the back while I was in the passenger seat: "if you flip the car upside down and shake it, anything which falls out you will be fined for" end of story. Anything which can become lethal during an accident is another thing he said. Apparently Utes can make quite a bit of mess when they have a prang.

jfoldbar
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Re: nets on utes

Unread post by jfoldbar » March 16th, 2016, 5:25 pm

GBC wrote: "if you flip the car upside down and shake it, anything which falls out you will be fined for" end of story..
but here in is the part i dont get.
a lot of the stuff that people put the nets over, if the ute is turn upside down and shaken, the net will not hold it.
just like the bogey tipper with a tarp. if that truck was turned over, the tarp will not stop whatever flying out.
a 10 ton excavator only needs a strap over it to be legally secured, but that truck flips over the strap aint gunna stop it flying out.

i get the whole idea of light stuff like buckets of tools or shoes or small stuff being netted. but at some point something becomes too heavy for a net to do anything if the ute flips over. does anyone know what that some point is, or even if there is one in the eyes of the law?
or is it just one of those things that depends on the cop discretion and u just gotta hope that you get a cop that has some practical knowledge with holding loads.

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