Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know courses?

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DJR96
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by DJR96 » May 9th, 2013, 10:19 pm

That shouldn't really be the case whizzo.

A bigger machine shouldn't be using any more gas for a given job than a smaller machine. And more gas flow doesn't always mean better effect. If it's coming out too fast it can create turbulence at the weld zone even drawing in air and making things worse.

Don't trust a flow meter with a dial gauge, they're only a rescaled pressure gauge.
It's preferable to use a regulator with a bobbin-in-a-tube flow meter, they do actually measure flow rate.
Cheers, Dave.
RCV Supertourer build:- [url]http://www.4wdaction.com.au/forum/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=36370[/url]

mickkk
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by mickkk » May 10th, 2013, 9:33 pm

Cheers for your advice mate.

Adon92
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by Adon92 » May 11th, 2013, 12:45 am

I am at beginner level with my cheapy gasless mig.

The tip seems to load up with spatter and some time stops the wire from coming out.

What am i doing wrong? I am using 0.8mm wire with a 0.9mm tip
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dhc4ever
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by dhc4ever » May 11th, 2013, 8:54 am

Torch angle and distance from the workpiece could be your issue.
Clean the area you are going to weld back to bare metal, also where the earth clamp attaches.
Keep about a 10 mm gap from the tip to the workpiece, and a torch angle of around 45 degrees, also play around with your settings to minimise spatter, your looking for a frying bacon type sound when your welding.
And to keep with the food concept, cooking spray is an effective non toxic anti spatter spray you can use on the nozzle and around the bits you don't want spatter to stick to.
Have a look through this guys site;
weldingtipandtricks.com and have a read through his mig welding section.

Cheers

DJR96
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by DJR96 » May 11th, 2013, 10:49 am

Yep, as above.

A tin of anti-spatter "tip dip" is a small investment that will last you for yonks. I will immediately clean the tip and shroud after a weld and dip it while it's still hot. The stuff then coats all surfaces nicely and any excess will also melt and drip off, ready for the next weld.

[Send me a PM if you'd like a can. I've got a few surplus Cigweld cans I don't need.]

Occasionally if you're holding the tip too close and the wire feed is a bit erratic it may arc directly from the contact tip to the job. When this happens it pretty much welds the wire into the end of the tip. Sometimes wire cutters will separate it and it'll be fine. Otherwise you need to grind the metal back to copper and push the wire through.
Cheers, Dave.
RCV Supertourer build:- [url]http://www.4wdaction.com.au/forum/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=36370[/url]

bouncing Benny
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by bouncing Benny » May 11th, 2013, 2:25 pm

Like they said ^^.
Also a lot of people over tighten the wire feed rollers, which more so with flux core deforms the wire, hard to see at a distance, can cause it to snag up a bit in the liner and also at the contact tip.
Back the tensioner off while in locked position, point gun somewhere you won't contact anything and grab the wire just before where it meets the wire feed,( make sure you're an inch back from guides so you there's no risk of getting your skin caught), pull trigger and adjust the tensioner to a point where it doesn't slip and you can't physically stop the wire with a finger & thumb grip.
There's a another method I've seen where you can point the gun at a piece of wood pull trigger, and adjust tensioner to a point where it doesn't slip.
If you get slip at the wire feed you'll land up with burn back, which is also caused by not enough wire speed, which'll then cause it to fuse to end of your contact tip.

whizzo
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by whizzo » May 12th, 2013, 8:06 am

DJR96 wrote:That shouldn't really be the case whizzo.

A bigger machine shouldn't be using any more gas for a given job than a smaller machine. And more gas flow doesn't always mean better effect. If it's coming out too fast it can create turbulence at the weld zone even drawing in air and making things worse.

Don't trust a flow meter with a dial gauge, they're only a rescaled pressure gauge.
It's preferable to use a regulator with a bobbin-in-a-tube flow meter, they do actually measure flow rate.
The fact is the larger machines usually come fitted with larger hand pieces.......the larger hand pieces have bigger wider nozzles.........large orifice more gas flow required.......particularly if you are not welding in still air.

cheers

DJR96
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by DJR96 » May 12th, 2013, 11:42 am

whizzo, as you know there isn't much I'll disagree with you about. But in this case I do.

A larger nozzle doesn't mean you need more gas. The size of the nozzle will of course alter the velocity of the gas exiting it. But you are only trying to maintain the same size gas envelope around the weld zone. Same volume of gas.

In fact, check this out:- http://www.ckworldwide.com/gas_saver.htm
Yes I know this is TIG, but as far as the gas goes it's the same principal.

However, as you say, if there is much ambient air movement you do need to increase gas flow to maintain said gas envelope. If you're really out in the open breeze you'll need to shelter the job. Sometimes using your body is enough. If the breeze is unavoidable and messing up the job, well, pack it up and pull out the trusty old stick welder.............
Cheers, Dave.
RCV Supertourer build:- [url]http://www.4wdaction.com.au/forum/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=36370[/url]

whizzo
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by whizzo » May 12th, 2013, 2:00 pm

Here is a simple fact...as you say...the gas velocity from the nozzle is reduced in larger handpieces......therefore greater gas flow is required to maintain an envelope at a given distance from the nozzle....there is nothing containing the envelope so it is all about flow.

In addition with a larger nozzle you are often forced to work with the nozzle further from the job with a longer extension of wire from the nozzle......where there is any airflow at all around the job it just compounds the whole issue......all combine to make larger hand pieces higher consumers of gas.

A smaller nozzle can work closer to the job, thus requires a smaller envelope to be maintained at a shorter distance away from the nozzle...in addition with increased flow due to the smaller orifice, the smaller nozzle will project an enlvelope further with less pressure

My machine has a nozzle tip 2/3 the size of many larger machines..that represents a considerably lower air flow required to project and maintain an envelope.

TIG is very different to MIG, because the distance of the nozzle to the work surface is more or less fixed by the arc length, and that is short in comparison to mig.

cheers

The lithgow panther
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by The lithgow panther » May 13th, 2013, 9:03 pm

To the OP, plenty of great advice already spoken so I won't write a novel, I'll just add to. :D

1/ clean job, clean tools
2/ square, tight and sexy
3/ strike pad - test your settings
4/ get comfortable (probably the only one that hasn't been mentioned, but my favourite)
so that's everything that goes into being comfortable ppe, seating, body and hand position(s)etc etc.
cradling my operating hand has worked for me.
5/ Keep the wind out
6/ Keep an eye out for precocity and birds%$@ welds and focus on long even welds.
7/ Clean rinse repeat :lol: :lol:

Basic stuff for the forum, better still getting someone to show you.

shamrock4life01
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by shamrock4life01 » May 13th, 2013, 9:26 pm

thats the trick, i know plenty of boiler makers. pulling one up to teach me is a whole different story. still playing though and getting better :rolleyes: :D
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The lithgow panther
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by The lithgow panther » May 13th, 2013, 10:09 pm

Beer is a great lubricant to get a hand, but after a while the welds get worse ha ha ha :lol: :lol:

Adon92
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by Adon92 » October 19th, 2013, 3:04 pm

I've given up trying to learn with my cheap MIG welder (has no adjustments or anything)

I was given a CIG "trans ARC easy welder 140amp" by my dads mate. I am teaching myself using some how-to's on the net but was hoping for a little more advice.

I went down to the local hardware shop and bought the only electrodes they had - 2.5mm suited to mild steel. The packet recommends to use around 75amp for 2.5mm rods. I've been practicing on 1.6mm mild steel exhaust piping with it set on 70amp until i get some thicker scrap metal. After using 3 rods, my welds are soooooo much tidier than my previous MIG welding

Can anyone give me recommendations on how many amps to go with with the 2.5mm rods for certain thickness' ?

And any other general tips on ARC welding would be much appreicated ;)

PS: it looks the same as this except with blue sides and top
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whizzo
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by whizzo » October 19th, 2013, 11:04 pm

Adon mate lots of us learned on the old easy welder.......I stepeed off one of those into a mig......I got mine in a swap for a yamaha keyboard back in the 90s from a mate.....I was with him when he originally baught it from Big W for $120 back in the 80's

If ya welding is better with the easy welder...it must not have been much of a mig.

One thing with the easy welder...don't be timid with the amps, they tend to under deliver a little....5 to 10 amps over the odds is not unreasonable

Remember too they don't have a great duty cycle....so give it a rest from time to time if ya running it hard.

One of the biggest helps in stick welding was from by brother.....run the current as hot as you can without blowing holes.

The other thing is the quality of the rods makes a big difference.

As does keeping the rods dry......go buy ya self a big enough plastic lunch box and put the whole pack of rods in there.

there is no substitute for fresh rods...but if they get a bit stale and damp, a couple of hours in the kitchen oven at 120C will charm them up.

Most rod packs should have a recommended current chart on the side

Remember you will need to run higher currents for V welds than flat welds...I used to run the same current but lighter rods for V welds in the same material

another little trick....if its the blue easy welder, the wheels will be mounted with a sort of curved bracket.....if you invert the bracket, you can put a small pair of castors on the front...that makes it a bit easier to live with.

OH they improve a bit if you replace the standard leads with heavier, and a better earth clamp...the hand piece is tolerable.

The thing with stick......is plenty of practice...the thing with stick, is to get consistently good welds, you have to be a good technical welder.....with a good MIG almost any muppet can produce good welds.

If you can pull good welds from the easywelder, when you can afford a better welder your struggles will be rewarded.

cheers

cheers

oversite
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Re: Basic welding skills - anyone got pointers or know cours

Unread post by oversite » October 19th, 2013, 11:09 pm

Yeah I learnt on the same type machine, when I finally steped to MIG (real cheap, no adjustment model), my welds got better and now I have a proper mig my welds are damn good!

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