Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

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Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 2nd, 2015, 8:55 pm

Hi every one. As I said in my post in the 4wd section, I would start a thread regarding the rebuilding of the Chesney GT Kamper into something that will suit us in our trips fossicking out west and of course, other places as well. First, a bit of reasoning behind the decision to go the way we have.
Many years ago, when the kids were quite young, we were quite heavily involved in the 4wd and camping scene. Starting with a tent, and as the kids grew, so did the tent and all the necessaries (and un-necessaries) as well. Several times we hired or was loaned a hard top camper which set us on a new learning curve. So eventually in 1988, we purchased a new Jayco Dove. Took it home and proceeded to strip it down. All the timber frame was glued and screwed (with little cross plates), as well as the cupboards. The wind up cables were replaced with aircraft stainless steel. And finally, the chassis was removed and replaced with a new heavy chassis with Alko torsion bar suspension.
The Jayco served us well for many years traveling around Australia. Trips included several trips into Arnhem Land, the Kimberleys, Strezlecki track, annual trips to Fraser Island and many other places. But that is really a different story.
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Now that the kids have grown up and moved out of home leaving just the two of us, we have enjoyed the tripping around the land by ourselves. But, as we get older, it becomes more of an inconvenience and a chore to set up camp, be it for a couple of days or a week or more.
So now has come the time to get set up with a camper that we can take most places which would include outback on fossicking trips. I know this introduction will be a bit long winded. But without an explanation, some would think us crazy for going in the direction we are headed..
We are getting too old to go through the effort with soft floor camper trailers.. We looked at hard floor campers, and while that had good points, we finally settled on the idea of going back to a Jayco type of camper. So we drew up a list of wants and don't wants gleaned by years of previous experiences. Some of these were;
Not a big unit, just enough space for two people to exist in reasonable comfort.
As water proof as possible. That means being dry in all types of weather, and no problems with minor creek crossings.
No timber floor (to rot). Which means as little timber construction as possible.
Every thing glued and screwed together. If not, then bolted.
A system where the canvas is not folded and trapped (and rubbed by the traveling motion and bulldust) and rendered unusable after the first twelve months.
As near as possible automatic, or at least an electric roof raising mechanism.
No fixed gas equipment in the camper., (no cracked pipes). Gas fridges on a whole are not efficient out west anyway and we use butane stoves and we have our larger version of an Oz Pig that we fit a camp oven inside. But carry a gas bottle for a hot water shower unit anyway.
12 volt power system for lights and refrigeration for approximately 5 rainy days. (after that, we would pack up and go home).. 240 volt for when power is available, and for a generator to power an onboard battery charger.
A strong enough unit that will go where ever we want (given driving with due care and attention), with a basic leaf spring suspension (that parts are readily available, or maybe carry a spare spring pack) with gas shock absorbers.
We didn't expect to find exactly what we had in mind. (although we did see one unit that would have suited, but it was $95,000.00 and we just couldn't justify the outlay. :rolleyes:

As some of the members may be aware, in the late 1970’s Chesney produced a total fiberglass camper called a GT. It was a very basic camper by todays standards. Its main claim to fame was that it was very light weight being designed to be towed by the small family car of that era. There was no real chassis to speak of, but two ‘top hat’ sections of 1/8” inverted, that the shape of the body of the camper was bolted into, and running the length of the camper, one down each side. There was a section of 2 inch angle welded to the ends of the top hat which formed a square frame, again bolted to the body. To this, an A frame of 3 ½” x 1 ½” channel was welded to the top hat. Spring hangers were also attached with 4 leaf slipper springs a 1 ½ axle with 13 inch wheels. A couple of pieces of 1 ½ angle were welded across mid frame to support a water tank. So, in all, the frame was very light duty. But the fiberglass body provided the strength. The body consisted of an outer shell to which an inner shell was bonded similar to a boat hull, and was immensely strong. And very water proof.

Way back in the 80’s I would have laughed at the idea of using one of these fiberglass bodies, but now it makes sense to me.
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 2nd, 2015, 10:07 pm

At the same time we were looking for the right donor camper. We were also looking for a Hilux to build into the tow vehicle. Keeping with the ‘keep it simple’ idea, we wanted diesel without any electronics. That is mechanical injection and minimal other electrics. This narrowed the field down somewhat, but we finally found a one owner 1997 duel cab bought and then traded back in to a Toyota dealer in western NSW. We got that trucked to Brisbane and completely stripped down with all mechanicals either replaced with new or totally rebuilt items. A long story in it’s self. An example would be the engine where the only original parts are the engine block, tappet cover and the sump. Everything else was replaced with new, including the injection pump and injectors. MTQ in Brisbane built a special ball race turbo using a RD32 compressor. The truck is dynoed at 100 HP at the rear wheels, although adjusting fuel can develop 125HP. But then it does use heaps of fuel getting just on 400K’s per tank. Torque is ‘way up there’ which is what we need for the tow vehicle. Other things, a 780Kg NPC clutch, new gearbox, rebuilt transfer case. Rebuilt front a rear axles with new drive shafts and diff locks. Complete new steering including steering box. Same for brakes, including a double diaphragm booster. And of course, all new suspension. All up, with buying the truck, it would be the dearest 1997 Hilux in Australia owing us about $26,000, and it isn’t even painted yet.. .. But it will go forever and if it does break something out west, we can find parts anywhere..

Then we found just what we were looking for. Not in bad condition for it’s age and not that molested with holes. No bashes, cracks or dings. Over the years it has had the spring hangers extended to gain more height and had 13 inch light truck tyres fitted. Canvas has been replaced in the last two years and is in very good condition.
Inside is pretty basic with cupboards consisting of sections cut out of the inner shell, plywood fascia with doors then screwed over the opening. But I guess that was the norm back in the 70’s. Now it’s just a case of getting it home and stripping out and evaluating what needs to be done.
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 3rd, 2015, 4:19 am

Well, we got the camper home and started the planning. The first thing to be addressed was the lifting system. Basically there is a bar (rhs) attached from the inner end of the bed frames (slides) running to a pivot point on the inside of each corner of the roof ( main lifting bar). Attached to this is a second bar via a pivot point about half way along. This second bar is attached to the camper body at a pivot point near each corner of the camper body and provides a cantilever for the main bar. The roof is raised by pulling the bed slide outwards. There is a hair spring acting on the cantilever bar to get the mechanism past the ‘null’ point, and there are tension springs operating within the bed slide to help in the movement. But, because the cantilever is situated halfway means that for every kilo of roof requires the same amount of effort to move the bed slide. When all the springs were new, maybe a fit 20 year old would have no problem dragging the bed slides out. (each end at a time). However, now that all the springs are well and truly sprung, it would need 2 x 20 year old fit guys and their 6 mongrel dogs to get that roof up. Certainly not what we would intend to do. But it was always our intention to convert the roof lifting to cable operation anyway. Also, the bed frames slid directly on the camper body with just a thin aluminium plate as a wear surface. This would also have to be changed. The inner end of the bed frames had a roller door wheel running in the frame. These would be changed to roller bearings.


Looking at the way the camper body was attached to the frame, the body was securely bolted to the frame (inverted top hat sections as described earlier) down each side. But attachment on each end was very minimal, and we wanted the fibre glass body to have zero twist as well. So taking all this into account, it was decided to make a steel combing along each end for the body which would be through bolted. Also a winch cable frame to take all loading off the fibre glass body and transfer the winching effort to the new chassis to be attached to the combing thereby holding the body firm to the chassis. Incorporated on each end of the combing would be a roller to take the weight of the bed frame.

Outer side of the combing, Through bolts are fitted through crush tubes.
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Inner side. Combing is made from 3mm FMS. Bed frame roller can be seen at the end. The switch is a limit switch to stop to out/raise movement. The green tubing is a sheath to direct the winch cable down through the body to the winch.
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The winch frame attached to the combing.
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The bottom of the winch frame sits on crush tubes between the frame and the chassis. The frame does not actually contact the body and the crush tubes are bonded to the fibre glass body. Every thing looks good in place. When the original frame is cut off , the winch frame crush tubes will bonded through the body and contact the new chassis. The front and rear frames will transmit all the loading directly to the chassis and also firmly attach the body to the chassis as well.
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 3rd, 2015, 8:32 pm

For the chassis, we used 50x50x3 RHS for the main frame. The A frame draw bar was 100x50x3 RHS, but pre-stressed using a 50x5 FMS rib with 50x3 FMS for the cap. The idea was to pre-stress the draw bar with a 25mm deflection, however when running the welds, the runs ended up a little too long and so we ended up with a 30mm deflection from the spring hanger to the hitch plate. The difference is un-noticable and only serves to make the draw bar more rigid anyway. The rear section of the chassis comprised of two sections of 50x50x3 RHS to form a figure 8 section. Stronger then 100x50 and just a bit heavier. The rear bar and wheel carrier was made of the same sections. When assembled and after loading poles into the rear annex pole pod, the draw bar can be lifted with two fingers. Very happy with the balance as the pre-calculated figures had worked out to about 10Kg at the hitch plate without the coupling. Will change the coupling for another when we work out which one suits, but for now the 50mm ball coupling is good.
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 3rd, 2015, 11:30 pm

The next step was to mount the camper body to the new chassis. A good friend owns a race car manufacturing business and it was arranged to use his vehicle hoist to lift the camper, remove all and sundry, and to fit it on the chassis. The timing was arranged for a Monday, between the last vehicle finished on the preceding Friday and before the start of the next project. Sounded great in theory, but when the day rolled around, there was a wreck from the weekend that had to be rebuilt for a race meeting in two weeks. So it was a case of getting in and finished by the end of Tuesday morning. In the rush, I forgot to bring the camera, both Monday and Tuesday. So no photos of this part of the project.
Basically what happened was the camper was wheeled in and lifted by the body. The tow frame, spring hangers, water tank mounts, and all other bits were cut off. (God blessed us when he made plasma cutters :lol: ).. The new chassis was rolled in and the body was lowered onto the chassis. Measurements were taken as to where the winch frame rails were to be to coincide with the internal winch frames.
The body was then lifted up and these rails were welded into place. The remaining inverted top hat channel was sanded and sealed, and the body was placed and aligned on the new chassis. Then the whole assembly was lifted by the new chassis and the top hat channel was seam welded to the chassis.
End result. The camper was ready to be towed home for final assembly. All easy said, but there was a lot of cutting and grinding before the end result.
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Rogers Cruiser
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Rogers Cruiser » September 3rd, 2015, 11:41 pm

I really like the adjustable spring locations, its a really awsome idea for those of us with several sets of tires.
'98-'06 - FJ-45 Ute fell over one day and didnt survive
'06-now - HJ-47 Troopy, restored and now daily driver.
'13-now - HJ-47 Ute, Farm fresh rust bucket, needs a restoration. viewtopic.php?f=22&t=152811

now - Off Road Box/Camper Trailer. viewtopic.php?f=134&t=153968&p=1792444#p1792444

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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 4th, 2015, 3:25 am

Rogers Cruiser.. Thanks Mate. The rear dumbjacks have multiple positions too. Helps if I want to fit longer shackles for softer articulation, or if we have to fit the shorter springs in an emergency. On my research, there was only two lengths of mass produced springs, so should be able to cover anything if need be.
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 4th, 2015, 8:53 pm

The next step was to rebuild the interior to suit our needs. As the interior consisted of a fiber glass inner shell. Sections had been cut out to form the original cupboards, some with shelving . One rudimentary drawer had been included, didn’t hold much at all. To our way of thinking, a cupboard was an area of wasted space unless things were piled up on each other to utilise all the space. So our way of thinking was to have mostly drawer space where all available space in the drawers is used to be best advantage.
Also because the inner shell was formed in a mold, the technology of the era required that all vertical surfaces comprise of an angle so the shell can be released from the mold. This meant that the cupboard faces were not vertical to the floor, and apart from looking pretty terrible from an aesthetic point of view, also made cabinet making a lot more tricky. Therefore the best solution was to make frame work that would be bonded and screwed to the existing fiber glass shell, then the cupboard areas to be converted to drawer carcasses. This way the interior shell would not lose any of its original strength, but would acquire additional strength with the frame work glued and screwed to the original.
Again we used the Bostik Extreme construction glue for the whole interior. This bonding agent was not only the bonding means, but was also used as a filler where needed. When set, the stuff can be drill, cut or sanded.
From Specialty Laminates Queensland, we ordered a vinyl timber grain wrap fixed to a sheets of light weight plywood for the finishing surface, as well as a couple of sheets of white laminex bonded to the same type of sheets for counter tops and inner faces for drawers and doors. Also sheets 9mm lightweight plywood to make cupboards and drawers and counter tops.
As said early in the post, we didn’t intend to incorporate a 3 way fridge, nor a gas cook top, so we ended up with ample top space to sit a two burner butane stove if the weather is bad. But I will get into the cooking arrangement later.
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Peter Aawen » September 4th, 2015, 9:01 pm

Looking pretty flash so far!! :thumb:

Any specific reason/s you decided to go with leaf springs & shocks (do they really do much on that angle?) carrying a beam axle instead of using HD ALKO torsion suspension again? You did run that under the last one, didn't you?
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 4th, 2015, 10:39 pm

Thanks Peter. We went back to leaf springs and shocks mainly for simplistic sake. Meaning that replacement is readily available and easy to change over on the side of the road, so to speak.The Alko torsion suspension we fitted was great when first fitted, (and it may have improved a lot over the last 15 or so years), but what we found was that after the first trip which was over to Western Australia, the suspension sagged a little as the rubber compressed. As time went on, the rubber seemed to compress and harden. This made the ride noticeably harsh to the point where we fitted a set of air shocks to take up the load. In other words, a sort of air suspension. As far as the shocks go on this chassis, the springs are fitted with rebound secondary springs attached to the top of the main leaf. The shocks are a supplement primarily to lessen the 'kick back' on the shackles. Hence the angle. As the shocks are foam filled nitrogen, they will work quite ok at that angle.

Now, I'm not knocking the Alko suspension, but a bit long winded example was on a trip to Darwin via the Gulf, Hells Gate, around to Roper Bar, then across to Katherine. We had matching Tupperware containers in a cupboard under the settee seat, one container had sugar, and another had rice. Also, in the same cupboard was waxed cardboard containers of UHT milk. This was nothing new as we had the same on trips before. On this trip, I noticed the camper was riding a lot rougher as the trip progressed. After Darwin, we did the Kakadu tourist thing, then met the ranger at Cahills crossing for our entry into Arnhem Land on our way to the Coburg Peninsula. We were given a set time to check in at the Merganella police station, so it was quite a rush to get there within the time. After checking in, we pulled up outside the settlement for a meal break, and we found that the ride had been so harsh that the lids had popped off the Tupperware containers, and the container of rice had 'leaped' into the container and commenced to pound the sugar to the consistency of icing sugar which then spread itself all around the cupboard. Added to this was that the wax on the milk cartons had broken down and the milk combined with the sugar and the bull dust that crept in and we had a brown mud setting to a consistency of concrete through everything else in the cupboard and my wife, (after threatening to quit and walk home), dug the goo out with a dust pan and egg slide. When we arrived back in Darwin was when the air shocks were fitted and the ride settled back to what it had been at the start. Also, I feel that there was not enough articulation on the suspension arms for off road travel. It would be great for highway use and reasonable roads though.
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 5th, 2015, 10:42 am

After the whole of the interior was stripped. Carcasses and frame work was built then glued and screwed to the existing fiber glass body. The frame work was built so that all cabinet faces were in a vertical plane. This meant that the base of the cabinet face was attached to the existing fiber glass body, but left about 10mm in some cases up to a 15mm difference at the top. Frame work was planed and built to allow for the difference. All timber frame work was bonded together and then bonded and screwed to the existing fiber glass. Then all panels were bonded to the frame work and fiber glass using the Bostik Extreme X glue.
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 5th, 2015, 4:41 pm

A couple of pics of the nearly finished interior.
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 6th, 2015, 4:36 am

The next step was to install the winches. We used two 3000Lb winches bought off Ebay. But before fitting, they were stripped and modified. Basically the winches are not bad value for the money paid and with a couple of modifications, they will do the job. First, to make the motors more efficient and reduce the amps, the armature winding's need to be soldered to the commentator segments. Quite common with these motors coming out of China, the armature winding connections to the commentator segments are just crimped. In my experiences, this not only causes high current draw but also slow revolutions. If anyone has ever used one of these winches for any reason and found over a period of time the winch speed drops off, then this is the main reason. Another problem is that there is no seal between the gear box and the armature housing. The gearboxes seem to be over packed with grease when assembled, and the grease works its way in and over the armature and the permanent magnets. Simple fix is to clean out and repack the gearbox with a good quality grease and fit a felt sealing ring on the armature shaft.
Doing both these things to the winches, dropped the working amps down to around 10amps while under load. However, having the cable pulling on a 2:1 ratio made most of the difference.
We used two winches, one for each end. The main reason was to simplify the cable mechanism and the reduce the length of cable. One wireless remote control operates both motors through a couple of slave relays and separate isolating switches which control the main relays (4) which are supplied by 30 amp circuit breakers (4) being one for each circuit.
The winch cable is 1/8” 7x19 aircraft grade stainless steel and has a breaking strain of about 400Kg. The cable sheath can carry a 7/32” cable and we may upgrade to that as it will probably wind cleaner on the winch drum. The smaller cable tend to not pack so evenly on the winch drum. For the smaller cable to wind cleanly, a spring loaded fairlead roller is used. This helps the cable overlay itself onto the next layer. It also helps to keep the drum tension as the roof lowers onto the camper body.
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Brisbane Puff » September 7th, 2015, 12:50 am

Well, all the electrics are completed. The power supply consists of two MF95 batteries mounted in the camper which can be connected to two additional MF95 batteries mounted in a battery box in the back of the tow vehicle. Battery charging can be one or more ways. From a 250watt solar panel mounted on the camper roof, connected to a smart regulator, also from a connection to the tow vehicle. We fitted a 120 amp alternator to the vehicle and this supplies charge to the batteries mounted in the rear of the tow vehicle, and in turn, charges the camper batteries. Both these systems can work together as the solar regulator recognises that there is a second current supply. We also fitted large secondary diodes to the solar panel supply as a backup safety system.
Alternative charging can be done via a C-Tek smart charger mounted in the camper, and in turn charger will also charge the vehicle batteries if they are connected. The charger is powered by an external 240 AC supply, or alternatively, a generator can be plugged into the camper, and this will supply the battery charger. There are two 240 AC power points mounted in the camper via a RCD and a circuit breaker. One to supply the battery charger, and the second just in case we need 240 volts for some reason.
There are six 12 volt control circuits, each with a separate circuit breaker. These circuits switch individual relays with power supplied to the relays from individual circuit breakers connected direct to the battery bank, which in turn power the various equipment like the fridge, water pump ect. Sounds overly complicated but the reason we did it like that is that the control circuits are wired with 4mm cable and run from various points in the camper, and the ‘main’ power circuits are 6mm or larger and are supplied direct from the battery bank via the shortest possible length. Mainly to keep the current draw and voltage drop as low as possible.
Internal lighting is by four LED light bars. We couldn’t find exactly what we wanted, so we made our own. A contact of ours has an aluminium extrusion and a corresponding clear PVC cover as well as clips to attach the extrusion to flat surfaces. The extrusion is supplied in 4.5 metre lengths so we were able to make the light bars the length we wanted. We purchased 5056 LED strips in warm white, and the end result is a quite bright light similar to a natural light bulb. We mounted four light bars, which can be individually controlled. That way we can have a couple of lights working while making dinner, and one when we sit down to eat. Of course, we use the four if we have a dinner party of twenty or more guests :lol: .. Seriously though, we have found that as we got older, the cool white of normal LED strips do not suit our vision whereas I can comfortably read fine print with the warm white lighting.
The aluminium extrusion idea was so successful that we made a couple of light bars that clip on to the annex poles, but instead of having long cables, these light bars just have a short ‘pig tail’ with a water proof connector, and we made up some ‘extension leads’ of various lengths with a switched 12 volt plug that connects to sockets mounted at external locations of the camper, again supplied by separate circuit breakers. A similar but shorter light bar clips inside the shower tent, again powered from an extension lead and external socket.
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Re: Chesney GT Kamper rebuild for off road

Unread post by Gary_M » September 7th, 2015, 1:52 am

Warm white has a higher CRI rating, CRI is Colour Rendering Index. It means cool white makes say orange and red look much the same, and does similar to other colour groups, colours are washed out. There might be good reason for the preference for warm whites.

Cool white APPEARS brighter but is not in reality, but the way our eyes work we perceive it as brighter. I dont fully understand the science behind it, but its something like that.

Oh, and thats a huge redesign. Lots of work, well thought out and implemented.

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