Chev 6.2/6.5L Diesel Engine Tips and Tricks

Discuss technical aspects of your 4WD with other owners, and share your opinions
Humvee
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Unread post by Humvee » July 2nd, 2007, 2:25 pm

Thanks Les, I appriciate the info

Les Addison
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More info on Radiators

Unread post by Les Addison » July 10th, 2007, 10:46 pm

After receiving so much interest regarding overheating. I thought I'd share some more interesting stuff on radiators. check this site , where you can do these tests your self.. aluminum radiator technical information .If your radiator has copper tanks , run a heavy ground wire from the mounting bracket to a good earthing point . Ifyou have plastic tanks, install a good size stainless PK through to the coolant, attaching the ground wire and sealing it off with Loctite. Try to eliminate any faulty wiring, especially ground wires from starter to chasis, and battery to body. Les

Les Addison
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6.2/6.5 Tacho sender wiring set up

Unread post by Les Addison » July 15th, 2007, 11:00 pm

The magnetic pickup type of tacho sender
requires ,one terminal to ground and the other from the tacho. VDO manufacture tachos to suit. This type of tacho also can be driven by the alternator. les
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Les Addison
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Over fuelling 6.2/6.5 V8

Unread post by Les Addison » August 23rd, 2007, 4:20 pm

In response to fueling up or down, for Stanadyne DB 28 type injector pumps. The safest way to adjust the overall fuel delivery is to remove the inlet manifold. DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS JOB BY REMOVING THE TOP OF THE INJECTOR PUMP SERIOUS OVER SPEEDING WILL OCCURE AND TOTAL DESTRUCTION OF THE ENGINE WILL RESULT. There are no tricks, no water or oil connections to do this job. Gaskets are treated and rarely break or damage. Stuff rags into inlet ports, so as no foreign things can fall into engine. Smear anti seize grease on manifold before replacement, so as next time off will be easy. 4 bolts as in pic 1 have to be resealed with Loctite thread sealer (or similar) as the threads go through to overhead gear oil splash. When the manifold is off, a small black plate in pic 2 is held on by 2 ¼ hex head bolts on the left side of the pump has to removed, the neoprene gasket will not be damaged. At this stage a small amount of fuel will leak out of the pump, soak it up with a rag placed in the valley beforehand. Using a mirror look into the hole as shown in the pic.
Have someone to turn the engine over using a 24m socket on the crank pulley bolt, or a spanner on the alt pulley applying pressure to the belt, till a black socket headed hexagon screw is lined up with the center of the hole Fit the Allen key as in pic.
(To increase fuel turn key clockwise.—To decrease fuel turn key anti clockwise) Note the screw can be quite had to turn as it applies pressure to a leaf spring. WARNING DO NOT TURN KEY MORE THAN 1/8th OF A TURN AT A TIME between road testing. The aim is to fuel up till slight wisping of black or grey smoke is evident at full throttle pulling up hill in 4th gear at around 60 to 100 kph. The best way to do this is to sit in rear of vehicle and view smoke from rear window. Caution do not do this test at night, as a false smoke indication will be seen. If necessary repeat this procedure to attain best results. If in doubt back of 1/8th of a turn. Best results are keeping track of EGTs or normal operating temps . At 100kph pulling caravan etc, General rule of thumb less than 450c to 480c cruising, will not increase operating temps. More than 480c to over 500c & up will start to impact on operating temps. Obviously EGTs will increase to over max 650c when climbing hills. Change gears and back off a little, short over hot periods are not harmful. If an increase in fuel is required, it should not be assumed that it will use more fuel, some times it actually will use less as the engine is operating with a better fuel air ratio and less throttle pressure. Les
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Mike Amen
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Endless Air Compressor

Unread post by Mike Amen » October 12th, 2007, 2:53 pm

Hi Les
Do you have any photos of how to mount an Endless Air type compressor to a Chev 6.5L?

Thanks

Mike

ozhumvee
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Unread post by ozhumvee » November 2nd, 2007, 8:13 pm

A quick and easy way to fit a tacho to a diesel that doesn't have a sender is to install a Tiny Tach Welcome to Design Technologies and Tiny-Tach just clamps on an injector line and picks up the pulses of diesel going down the line.

Les Addison
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Diesel Tachos

Unread post by Les Addison » November 2nd, 2007, 9:20 pm

Hi Ozhumvee. Absolute rippa mate. Have bookmarked it. Ideal fix and simple hook up. That, with digital pyro is good set up. Our test Tacho and timing light worked the same way. Les

Eco-Gas
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Unread post by Eco-Gas » November 4th, 2007, 9:59 pm

VERY KNOWLEDGABLE LES

Very comprehensive I must say

Well done

RR
Les Addison wrote:Hi to Kingchevy . wow man, you have touched on one of the favorite chevy questions.:mad: I chased the problem for 8 years,for my own, and several other clients . For all overheating problems there is rarely one answer alone, to establish the cause . Firstly on these engines there is 2 types of belt drives, the early 6.2s and 6.5s had V belts , the later ones had Serpentine belts. If your engine had a serpentine belt ,and you now have fitted V belts, the waterpump will be rotating in the wrong direction. Now you'r going to ask me how do I tell . When I work out how to add pics, I will post them . Ok next thing .You have to start with the basics . Does the fan lock up PROPERLY ,can you hear it roaring , does the thermostat work properly and what type is it & what temp is it.(( Are you positive the gauge is accurate.)) Is there a coil spring in the bottom hose. Air flow into radiator.Is there any restrictors in the system. What width belts. How many belts drive it. What kind of fan are you using,(do not use electric fans). What kind of pulleys are on it . Who did your conversion ?? and engine build. Now we get to the good part.. What type of radiator is it . Std Toyota ? alum or copper.Or one of these so called you beut ones. What side, pass, or driver, does the top rad hose go into. Run the motor till it gets to normal temp, take the top off the overflow bottle, put the rubber tube into a half full coke bottle of water, raise the revs to about 1500 and check to see if there is any bubbles blowing from the tube , which would indicate a blown head gasket.... From now on it gets interesting. Let me know all the answers to the questions, before we get to the nitty gritty.. There is an answerI will tell you when all else fails:D...... Les
Rob
07 NS turbo diesel 5 door Pajero
99 Pathfinder
0412 30 40 30
www.Eco-Gas.com.au
DIESEL / LPG ENHANCEMENT FOR TURBO & NON TURBO VEHICLES

DeadWood
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Unread post by DeadWood » December 2nd, 2007, 10:55 pm

Hi to Kingchevy . wow man, you have touched on one of the favorite chevy questions.:mad: I chased the problem for 8 years,for my own, and several other clients . For all overheating problems there is rarely one answer alone, to establish the cause . Firstly on these engines there is 2 types of belt drives, the early 6.2s and 6.5s had V belts , the later ones had Serpentine belts. If your engine had a serpentine belt ,and you now have fitted V belts, the waterpump will be rotating in the wrong direction. Now you'r going to ask me how do I tell . When I work out how to add pics, I will post them . Ok next thing .You have to start with the basics . Does the fan lock up PROPERLY ,can you hear it roaring , does the thermostat work properly and what type is it & what temp is it.(( Are you positive the gauge is accurate.)) Is there a coil spring in the bottom hose. Air flow into radiator.Is there any restrictors in the system. What width belts. How many belts drive it. What kind of fan are you using,(do not use electric fans). What kind of pulleys are on it . Who did your conversion ?? and engine build. Now we get to the good part.. What type of radiator is it . Std Toyota ? alum or copper.Or one of these so called you beut ones. What side, pass, or driver, does the top rad hose go into. Run the motor till it gets to normal temp, take the top off the overflow bottle, put the rubber tube into a half full coke bottle of water, raise the revs to about 1500 and check to see if there is any bubbles blowing from the tube , which would indicate a blown head gasket.... From now on it gets interesting. Let me know all the answers to the questions, before we get to the nitty gritty.. There is an answerI will tell you when all else fails:D...... Les
Image Image

So what was the answer when all else fails Les ???

Les Addison
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What was the answer

Unread post by Les Addison » December 11th, 2007, 7:18 pm

Hi DeadWood.The short answer to that is , after you do all the normal checks, is a Hi flow, low friction core radiator, coupled to a Hi flow water pump. I already had the pump did not fix the problem soon as I changed the radiator to a #9488 core, instant fix. Les

Les Addison
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What was the answer

Unread post by Les Addison » December 11th, 2007, 7:24 pm

Hi DeadWood.The short answer to that is , after you do all the normal checks, and do the other mods I have mentioned for the V8s, is a Hi flow, low friction core radiator, coupled to a Hi Output water pump. I already had the pump did not fix the problem, soon as I changed the radiator to a #9488 core, instant fix. Has also worked very well on unmodified vehicles with their standard water pumps. Les

Les Addison
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Air leaks in fuel systems

Unread post by Les Addison » January 2nd, 2008, 9:42 am

Pumps rarely leak air in, as most of the system is under preasure except for the Transfer pump situated at the rear where the fuel delivery hose attaches to it.
Air leaking into fuel systems can be very difficult to find as some times it wont show a fuel leaking joint, and can cause all sorts of problems. It can be done easily with the right tools. All you need is to get a few short pieces of clear plastic hose to suit the sizes of your pipe system, and a couple of brass joiners. Start from the fuel tank, install the clear hose, start the engine and check if there are bubbles in the clear hose. Repeat this squence at all joints Until problem is found. Throw away fuel filters are prone to suck air from the rolled edges. CAV types can leak past the rubber gaskets and O rings and taper seated brass barbs, and sometimes cracked aluminium housings. The other common place for air leaks is the fuel filter primer pump at the diaphragm or the seal on the pump stem. Make sure you fit the clear hose to the fuel return line from the injector pump to the tank as air can be sucked through worn or faulty injector pump seals. It pays to check the fuel cap for faulty vent action as this causes a vacuum in the system which may suck air in at a faulty joint and will sometimes draw fuel back to the tank from the lift pump and injector pump after shut down. This causes the engine to stop after a short run then hard starting as the pump is empty. Some vehicles especially Nissans had problems with fuel syphoning back to the tank over night, a small non return valve can be fitted in the line to stop this from happening. Les

BowTieGQ
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Unread post by BowTieGQ » January 5th, 2008, 12:43 pm

Sorry for the hijack guys. Any info or tips for a petrol Chev conversion? eg what setup for radiator as mentioned etc etc? Mainly after things that most dont think about such as cooling etc.

Corry
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Unread post by Corry » January 5th, 2008, 2:35 pm

Les, after liaising with you about a year ago, I ended up chasing down, well a fellow Toyota owner chased down for me, a V8TD Auto 80 series. It is running what I believe is a 6.5TD (PM sent) with a T700R auto with manual lock up switch.
All has been running good and the conversion was completed by Dewars Performance in Albury. Of late the engine has been difficult to start, I have been thinking glow plugs.
Symptoms are, cranks over fine but doesn't want to fire up. Will crank over for some time, and will even emit fume/fuel vapour from exhaust. Eventually fires (lot of smoke from exhaust), and will run fine. Sometimes during the day it will be hard to start again if I switch it off, sometimes easy and fires after a couple of rotations.
Pre any problems, I was offroad one day, and the engine just stopped. Couldn't start, so towed home and it fired up the next day. I figured I had gotten air in the lines and both fuel tanks were running low and the car was on some good angles and slopes.
I replaced the fuel lines, from tank hardline in engine bay to both filters (factory Toyota and aftermarket).
Not sure what is going on, am planning on dropping in to diesel mob in Rockhampton (Hillman Motors) for injector overhaul, pump overhaul, and glow plugs. Would prefer not to, motor hasn't done many K's I'm led to believe.
Any suggestions?

Also, what temps should these engines run at. Mine will sit on 85C while normal offroading and highway driving, but will climb to 93-95C while giving a flogging. Don't have pyro's installed as yet, boost gauge is reading 15psi tops when on highway pulling heavy trailer at full throttle. Generally sits at around 5psi when coasting and gets to around 10psi when normal driving up steep hills.
All round, love the set up, couldn't wish for anymore. Engine and Auto are a great combo with the vehicle and 37" tyres. Good choice for an offroad toy.

Cheers
Corry
'98 80 40th Anniversary 4.5/Auto - Tour,
'92 80 6.5V8TD/Auto/37's/Ute - Toy
VE Senator Signature LS3/Auto

Les Addison
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V8 petrol conversion

Unread post by Les Addison » January 5th, 2008, 9:42 pm

BowTieGQ wrote:Sorry for the hijack guys. Any info or tips for a petrol Chev conversion? eg what setup for radiator as mentioned etc etc? Mainly after things that most dont think about such as cooling etc.
Hi BowTie GQ. Welcome mate. It will be a nice set up, Same precautions with all conversions, there is heaps of info re V8 petrols, they do have similar problems with water flow and air locks. Find out about HI Output pumps and remember Nissan fan hubs are notorious for not locking up properly. Les

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